Breaking the Anaerobic Barrier

The best exercise is engaging the most muscles through their complete range of motion against moderate resistance in maximum intensity intervals until exhaustion.


There are a few ways of maximizing the exercise interval by adjusting:

  • Duration (time or distance) of the exercise interval.

  • Intensity (speed, resistance) of the exercise interval.

  • Duration of the recovery interval.

  • Number of repetitions of both the intensity interval and recovery interval.

It is the intensity of the exercise interval that has the most profound physiological effects. The more extreme the intensity the more benefits of the exercise.

Only through maximum intensity of exercise is the most fuel depleted and it is through the dramatic rate of depletion that causes the most optimal increase in metabolic recovery. The more dynamically homeostasis is disrupted, the greater the adaptability — the Specific Adaptation to an Imposed Demand. The more intense the workout the better metabolic effects.

It is the difficulty of the workout that should be the goal of the exercise. It is much better to exercise hard for short time than easy for long time.

One of the most important goals of exercise is to drop fuel levels as quickly as possible — to have multiple disturbances in homeostasis over time. This is done through repetitions of intense intervals.

Once the intensity of the exercise disrupts homeostasis, many responses occur in addition to normal metabolism: the heart increases its pumping capacity and becomes stronger, arteries become more flexible, capillaries create anastomosis through muscles, mitochondria are used to their extreme and additional mitochondria grow inside muscle tissue.

The Anaerobic Threshold

There comes a time during an extremely intense exercise interval when the respiratory system cannot supply enough oxygen to allow the body to continue working.

This is the shift from aerobic metabolism to the glycogen/ lactic acid system — anaerobic metabolism.

During exercise at any given intensity, lactic acid accumulates in the bloodstream and is metabolized. The higher the intensity, the faster lactate builds up. But there will come a time when the exercise intensity increases to the point when the production of lactic acid exceeds its rate of removal. This is the lactate or anaerobic threshold.

Breaking the Anaerobic Barrier

When you cross the anaerobic threshold, the other energy systems — the glycogen/ lactic acid and ATP systems — are being trained for adaptation. This will push homeostasis to higher levels of function.

As you cross your anaerobic threshold then you are increasing your aerobic capacity because the aerobic functions have increased in proportion to anaerobic work. You are also increasing your anaerobic capacities. In reality, these improvements will have very positive effects on your quality of life and your functionality will be profound.

Anyone can break the anaerobic barrier, if the intensity of the exercise is enough. Those people who are unfit reach anaerobic threshold at a lower heart rate while the more fit people will cross their anaerobic barrier at a higher heart rate. The fitter the person, the higher the anaerobic threshold.

The fastest way to cross the anaerobic barrier is to engage the most muscles through their complete range of motion against moderate resistance in maximum intensity intervals.

The best way to engage the most muscles through their complete range of motion against moderate resistance in maximum intensity intervals is by using the Myoride Exercise Machine.